Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

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La
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Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby La » Fri Aug 04, 2017 9:17 am

Interesting article in Outside Magazine.

https://www.outsideonline.com/2229791/w ... letes-rich
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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby Jwolf » Fri Aug 04, 2017 9:56 am

Some interesting ideas in the article, but the statistics are very non-scientific.

...nearly 75 percent of runners earn more than $50,000, and about 85 percent work in white-collar, service, or educational settings. A 2013 report published by USA Cycling shows much the same: More than 60 percent of individuals who compete in cycling events claim household incomes above $75,000. And though it doesn’t track employment, the same USA Cycling report shows that 66 percent of cyclists have at least an undergraduate degree.


If $50-75,000/year income and/or "white-collar job" is their benchmark for "rich", then there are way more people in those categories who do NOT participate in endurance sports.

Also, the same participation demographics would likely be seen for things like yoga, Pilates, CrossFit, and the many other boutique gym memberships (Orange Theory FItness, etc.)-- things like CrossFit have measurement bars like endurance sports, but things like yoga and Pilates do not.
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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby La » Fri Aug 04, 2017 11:21 am

They talk about the main things being: having the time to exercise, having the money to buy equipment and enter events, but the more interesting thing (to me) is more about it being attractive to people who are in white collar jobs. I think that's a more valid correlation than simply income.
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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby Spirit Unleashed » Fri Aug 04, 2017 1:00 pm

I don't think it is about the pursuit of pain. I think it is time and money availability; plus I didn't work with my body all day.
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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby Dstew » Sat Aug 05, 2017 12:54 pm

Spirit Unleashed wrote:I don't think it is about the pursuit of pain. I think it is time and money availability; plus I didn't work with my body all day.


Of course it is. It provides an artificial and additional sense of meaning and purpose on top of the objectivity of a race result. If it were "easy" then anyone can and would do it. So it makes it worthwhile and also provides a sense of individuality, of "awesomeness" or "special" to the event. You may shuffle papers on your desk all day, your boss may not recognize your effort and you are but one of many nameless, faceless cogs but run a marathon and all of a sudden, you are one of 500,000 out of hundreds of millions.

Now Oprah sort of ruined this in that all of a sudden, mere mortals were running marathons. Some of the prestige, allure was tarnished but the runner sub culture adjusted by imposing the Oprah standard. Your marathon achievement is still intact if you can run it faster than Oprah or around 4:30. I do not believe it was a coincidence at around this time, ultras had increasingly participation. That is the thought that any idiot can run a marathon but it takes a special sort of idiot to run an ultra or multiple marathons. Anything to separate and elevate one above the crowd and the way to do that is "pain".

As a side note and in my personal experience, the utility of pain does have limits. In my circle of friends, family and coworkers, running a marathon is impressive, running a 50 K road race is a sign of mental illness. And what I have found very interesting is in cycling, I have a nice 60 - 80 K ride depending upon the route where turn around at a quaint village set in the foothills where there is a coffee shop populated by other cyclists doing the same ride. That is good. But tell someone I am doing a 100 K ride, something quite tame by serious cyclist standards and universal reply is "WHY". So it would seem we need enough pain that makes if difficult, hard and thus requires a certain amount of dedication and commitment but not so much so that it is just masochistic.

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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby NMG » Mon Aug 07, 2017 5:13 pm

It seems like the article is speaking about endurance sport participants who are very serious into training and pushing the limits of what they can accomplish. What percentage of runners fit this category? I'd hazard a guess that it's quite small within the overall population of runners. Just because you run a few races per year, does not mean that you are looking to subject yourself to pain or attain some arbitrary reward that you can use to boost your ego. Maybe you just like running, LOL.

I was drawn to running to lose weight. That's it. I stuck with it because I was seeing results. After a while, I realized that I enjoyed it so I still do it.

Why do I enjoy it? I find that it's a good stress release. It doesn't take allot of time. It's pretty darn cheap compared to other sports. It allows me to get lots of fresh air. I can do it year round. It's helps keep me healthy. It's really nothing to do with the pursuit of "pain" or boosting my ego. I'm also not an overly competitive person, so that probably has something to do with it.

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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby jonovision_man » Tue Aug 08, 2017 11:34 am

NMG wrote:I was drawn to running to lose weight. That's it. I stuck with it because I was seeing results. After a while, I realized that I enjoyed it so I still do it


Weight loss for me too originally.

I'm not sure how my income factored into it... maybe if I was lower income I'd have other more pressing concerns than a little bit of junk in my trunk.

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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby Dstew » Wed Aug 09, 2017 12:36 am

I started to run because I was in a hot gym in the summer maintaining the weight loss I enjoyed when I saw people running outside. I had no idea there were road races for mortals until a coworker and I were talking about "jogging" and he told me I could do well in a race. I finished my first 10 K in a little under 49 minutes and had thought I would be near the end given my only real exposure to running had been through watching the Olympics.

My bucket list marathon turned into qualify for Boston, etc, etc.

But if I go back to why I even needed to lose weight, it was because as I progressed in my white collar job, I started to become less active. Very active as a child and into my 20s but then I did not have the time or energy to play hockey, soccer and even soft ball. As I aged, I played like I was 18 and at 30, you pay a price. No pain, no gain. Sweat equity. I did take up golf - healthy but not "fit" per say. So running was also to help my golf game.

As I rose through the corporate ranks, slowly but surely quantity started to matter less to how I was judged and instead, it became quality. Problem being, quality was in the eye of the beholder. So for example, I had a coworker who was loved by management. We were tasked with 3 outside the office meetings per month or 36 over the year. He did 10 all year but he got an "exceed" expectation because he was told they knew how hard it was for him to do so. I had 50 meetings, I was given a "meets" expectation because ... real reason was I was near the to of the pay scale and so they could not afford to give me an "exceeds". I contrast that qualifying for Boston was an objective standard and in turn, all I had to do was pay for that with blood, sweat and tears. Thus pain in effect met an objective reward. Add to that, I was recognized by friends, family and coworkers as being awesome and special. The nameless faceless dehumanizing impact of the modern corporate world was beaten back through running marathons. The empty and dark void filled with doing something so objectively hard that few did it. Thus it also spoke to my individuality, identity as well as ego and vanity and pride.

And by my 40s, I had earned the right to take an extra 30 - 60 minutes over lunch and thus I could get in the workouts I needed in order to run marathons in a manner that served a number of psychological and emotional purposes. All the time, stress relief and weight control were starting to become nice additions rather than the reason I ran. I had 6 pairs of $150 - 200 shoes I could use. Gels, entry fees, etc, etc and the cost to Boston were due to my income level.

Thus this article spoke to me.


Cycling events - aside from the young studs, a huge group of people who could be my clone. Accomplished professionals who have the leisure time to cycle. Something goes wrong in the house, call the guy as I have a long ride to do.

Cost:

I have a very nice $2,500 bike with all of the accessories. But it is not even close the to most expensive bikes there. More at the lower end of the range.

$190 Bib shorts, $80 jersey, $20 socks, $150 shoes and $150 or more to ride a fondo.

As a side note, with the accumulation of damage through inflicting the amount of pain I did on myself, I got a lot of very nice medals, memories of great accomplishments and achievements and more recently a visit for the ghost of endurance events of the future. My mother in law is 83. She had been playing tennis at a high level until this year. Mess up her back, surgery. Then weekly chiro and massage for years. Injections. But finally, this caught up to her and now is barely functioning at times. I was reminded of my dad who attacked activities as I did and although had the strength of a 50 year old at age 69, would have to go through a 2 hour routine in order to play nine holes of golf. He was about to quit hockey and was scaling back everything else as his body was strong and powerful but failing. Things have worked out this year that I can squeeze out a 152 K and 160 k ride in September. But I have now reached a point where regardless of the reward, the pain is no longer worth it. I am done taking pills and using gels just to be able to move the next day. So after September, no more races. If I do a ride, it will be for a good charity I support and no longer than 100 K.

I am going to a massage therapist to help hold my body together for another six weeks. She shared with me a number of stories of people such as myself - driven, competitive and always searching for the next "high" from pushing too far, too many times and/or too fast. Addicts with the drug being an endurance sport and only worth doing, only worth being proud of if you have suffered. And having their bodies give out and then being lost. Who they are was what they accomplished and then that is gone. No one shares those stories on the internet. That a fun and healthy hobby becomes an obsession and if you have the means and resources, easy to take it too far.

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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby NMG » Wed Aug 09, 2017 5:32 pm

Dstew wrote: As a side note, with the accumulation of damage through inflicting the amount of pain I did on myself, I got a lot of very nice medals, memories of great accomplishments and achievements and more recently a visit for the ghost of endurance events of the future. My mother in law is 83. She had been playing tennis at a high level until this year. Mess up her back, surgery. Then weekly chiro and massage for years. Injections. But finally, this caught up to her and now is barely functioning at times. I was reminded of my dad who attacked activities as I did and although had the strength of a 50 year old at age 69, would have to go through a 2 hour routine in order to play nine holes of golf. He was about to quit hockey and was scaling back everything else as his body was strong and powerful but failing. Things have worked out this year that I can squeeze out a 152 K and 160 k ride in September. But I have now reached a point where regardless of the reward, the pain is no longer worth it. I am done taking pills and using gels just to be able to move the next day. So after September, no more races. If I do a ride, it will be for a good charity I support and no longer than 100 K.

I am going to a massage therapist to help hold my body together for another six weeks. She shared with me a number of stories of people such as myself - driven, competitive and always searching for the next "high" from pushing too far, too many times and/or too fast. Addicts with the drug being an endurance sport and only worth doing, only worth being proud of if you have suffered. And having their bodies give out and then being lost. Who they are was what they accomplished and then that is gone. No one shares those stories on the internet. That a fun and healthy hobby becomes an obsession and if you have the means and resources, easy to take it too far.


There are also loads of people whose body gives out on them even though they haven't participated in endurance sports. It's a basic side effect of aging. My wife is a nurse and you wouldn't believe the amount of times she has to explain to people (usually families who expect miracles to be worked) that 60, 70 and 80 year old bodies ARE NOT the same as 20, 30 and 40 year old bodies.

In 2017 the average life expectancy in Canada was 79 for men and 83 for women. Things are going to start breaking down as you approach that age. It's normal. I'd rather have my body break down while doing something that I enjoy, that having it break down while remembering what it was like. Get the most out of this life as you can. You've only got one and you never know when your time is going to be up.

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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby ultraslacker » Wed Aug 09, 2017 5:37 pm

hell, I'm only 39 and my body is already slowing down. It has nothing to do with endurance sports. If anything, running has made me healthier.
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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby Jwolf » Thu Aug 10, 2017 9:35 am

Dstew wrote:
Spirit Unleashed wrote:I don't think it is about the pursuit of pain. I think it is time and money availability; plus I didn't work with my body all day.


Of course it is. It provides an artificial and additional sense of meaning and purpose on top of the objectivity of a race result.


Would you possibly be able to admit that not everyone has had the same experience as you?

NMG wrote:It seems like the article is speaking about endurance sport participants who are very serious into training and pushing the limits of what they can accomplish. What percentage of runners fit this category? I'd hazard a guess that it's quite small within the overall population of runners. Just because you run a few races per year, does not mean that you are looking to subject yourself to pain or attain some arbitrary reward that you can use to boost your ego. Maybe you just like running, LOL.

I was drawn to running to lose weight. That's it. I stuck with it because I was seeing results. After a while, I realized that I enjoyed it so I still do it.

Why do I enjoy it? I find that it's a good stress release. It doesn't take allot of time. It's pretty darn cheap compared to other sports. It allows me to get lots of fresh air. I can do it year round. It's helps keep me healthy. It's really nothing to do with the pursuit of "pain" or boosting my ego. I'm also not an overly competitive person, so that probably has something to do with it.


This pretty much sums it up for me too.

Not everyone who is drawn to endurance sports takes it to an unhealthy extreme. Not everyone is in the pursuit of pain or pushing themselves so far over the limit that their body breaks down. For many of us it's a very positive experience overall.

For me it has never been about the pursuit of pain, but only the pursuit of a healthy lifestyle. Pain is bad- means I've gone too far and got injured and can no longer do what I love. Which means modification and moderation- not condemnation of the entire pursuit of a healthy lifestyle. Having something to train for gives me a sense of challenge an accomplishment, which makes the exercise more satisfying and enjoyable.
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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby ultraslacker » Thu Aug 10, 2017 10:20 am

Jwolf wrote:
Dstew wrote:
Spirit Unleashed wrote:I don't think it is about the pursuit of pain. I think it is time and money availability; plus I didn't work with my body all day.


Of course it is. It provides an artificial and additional sense of meaning and purpose on top of the objectivity of a race result.


Would you possibly be able to admit that not everyone has had the same experience as you?


After all these years of the broken record saying the same line over and over and over again, you are asking it to change now? :P
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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby Jwolf » Thu Aug 10, 2017 10:39 am

ultraslacker wrote:
Jwolf wrote:
Dstew wrote:
Spirit Unleashed wrote:I don't think it is about the pursuit of pain. I think it is time and money availability; plus I didn't work with my body all day.


Of course it is. It provides an artificial and additional sense of meaning and purpose on top of the objectivity of a race result.


Would you possibly be able to admit that not everyone has had the same experience as you?


After all these years of the broken record saying the same line over and over and over again, you are asking it to change now? :P


Haha- I know- the question was slightly rhetorical.

But when someone tries to generalize their experience to others, I find it pretty annoying.
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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby Dstew » Thu Aug 10, 2017 4:55 pm

An article was presented based upon studies and observations. Someone suggested that those studies were wrong but in my instance and from the people I see, they were correct. As usual, people became offended that somehow running is not treated as the greatest activity in the world and there is no wrong way to do it. God forbid that the principle of moderation would apply.

Running a number of marathons is not going to be a healthy or wise choice for most people. It does not mean that there are a few exceptions but generally speaking, if one were to run 10 K a day or so with a few rest days sprinkled in, that would address every health and fitness concern there is. This is in one way shape or form close to what the article was speaking towards. So the one statement that people are having issues with disability because they are not doing enough endurance work is silly and baseless.

I love the irony and the complete lack of self awareness of people how are fighting a endless string of running injuries and yet continue to delude themselves into thinking that not only can they continue to run as they once did, that they have to enter half marathons or longer events. No one is saying and nor I am that you should stop running but one would think at a certain point in time they might actually listen to their body, to really look at why they have one running injury after another and, I do not know, modify that behaviour? In other words is that if someone registers for a race and they train for a race and virtually every single time they get hurt, do not register for a race. Instead, just go out and run with no expectations, no commitment. If doing anything over 9 K aggravated a knee or a ankle, stop running over 9 K. If a 5:00 minute per kilometer pace hurts your back, slow down. This all comes down to vanity, ego and pride and the other crap is merely rationalizations and justifications to in order to satisfy vanity, ego and pride. If you can do it and not be in pain, great. There was a recent British study that showed tremendous health benefits not from doing Gran Fondos or weekly 100 K rides but from bike commuting. It is not special, it is not awesome and all of the other adjectives used to describe the accomplishments of a few outliers who in turn may be doing what they are doing in a mindless manner because they are addicted. But, it is extremely healthy on every single level.

Pain = reward. Rewards that can be internal and external. When pain is hurt, go for it. When pain becomes harm, then it is time to re-evaluate. I stopped playing softball because I had to visit the ER because of an injury playing softball. The halls were full of middle aged men and woman in soft ball uniforms. The doctor shook his head when I saw my injury and asked, "what is wrong with you people". I asked him to explain and it was he said you all think you are in your teens and so you are diving for balls and doing things you could once do. But now, you are sitting at a desk all day, your muscles are tighter and not as powerful and so you cross over the line and there is a knee or whatever, is blown out. For me, I knew I could not pull back and play within myself as others could so I quit. I am finally at the same place with my running. It is a great beautiful day and I would love to put on my shoes and go for a run but my healing from years of abuse is not complete. I could use duct tape and delusion to believe that I could make another comeback and I may even be able to do so but should I?

So I love being judged and lectured to by people who have not come close to accomplishing what I have done running and cannot go more than a few months, sometimes weeks or even days before they are limping around with yet another running injury because they had to enter this or that event. IF training to run a half marathon ALWAYS results in an injury, how insane is it not to then move down to the 10 K. If that causes an injury, then the 5 K. If that is still too much, then just run or jog to a lesser amount. If that is too much, take up cycling, swimming or hiking or crossfit or whatever.


My whole point is that a certain point in time, just about everyone has a breaking point. That is a due to a combination of too much, too often and/or too far. This is to not to say once someone hits that point, they need to cease running although that may be the case for some but it is a sign to reduce, moderate their approach. That pride, vanity and ego gets in the way of an honest conversation between your body and yourself. Or to have a debate about the relative merits of doing a moderate and reasonable amount of running for health and fitness as opposed to that of endurance or extreme running. But I now see that I was deluding myself to believe that is possible. The primal reaction will always be, RUNNING GOOD and there are no conditions, no caveats and no room for debate. And the only rebuttal is to falsely suggest that is anyone were to suggest that running multiple marathons may not be the best option as but one example, they are arguing are also arguing a healthy dose of running is also bad. I have been consistent in my belief and argument that running is a very good drug. One of the best out there but as with any medicine, there is always the risk of taking too much. But again, on this site, there is no room for discussion about that and again instead, anyone who raises questions about dose is raising questions about running overall and needs to be dismissed and shunned.

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Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby ultraslacker » Thu Aug 10, 2017 7:23 pm

Not at all. We're just tired of reading your nigh-identical, sermonizing 10,000 word diatribes month after month, year after year.

Especially after you told us you had no use for us and were leaving forever.

Maybe I shouldn't say "we" since I can only speak for myself. I'm tired of reading your diatribes. I'm offended by your statement that you have "no use for runners". I have no use for someone who is so in love with the sound of his own voice (digital though it may be) that he rambles on and on endlessly repeating himself over and over again ad nauseam with no regard for the fact the he lost his audience at least 500 iterations ago.


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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby jonovision_man » Fri Aug 11, 2017 7:48 am

Jwolf wrote:
ultraslacker wrote:
Jwolf wrote:
Dstew wrote:
Spirit Unleashed wrote:I don't think it is about the pursuit of pain. I think it is time and money availability; plus I didn't work with my body all day.


Of course it is. It provides an artificial and additional sense of meaning and purpose on top of the objectivity of a race result.


Would you possibly be able to admit that not everyone has had the same experience as you?


After all these years of the broken record saying the same line over and over and over again, you are asking it to change now? :P


Haha- I know- the question was slightly rhetorical.

But when someone tries to generalize their experience to others, I find it pretty annoying.


I'm sure we all do.

(see what I did there?)

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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby ultraslacker » Fri Aug 11, 2017 10:59 am

:lol:

but with 5 words instead of 5000.
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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby Avis » Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:13 pm

I don't think anyone addressed this point, which occurred to me just now: "Rich" people also play golf and tennis; these are sports are also beyond the financial reach of "poor" people. Are golf and tennis players also motivated by pain?
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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby La » Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:52 pm

Avis wrote:I don't think anyone addressed this point, which occurred to me just now: "Rich" people also play golf and tennis; these are sports are also beyond the financial reach of "poor" people. Are golf and tennis players also motivated by pain?

Well, besides the point that golf isn't a real sport ;) there's a huge social/networking component to golf (and to some degree, tennis). In golf, especially, I think people are motivated by improving their score, which is not unlike the drive runners have to improve their times. And it might not be pain motivated, but it's certainly achievement motivated, in a way that it's just you against the course.

I probably mis-labeled the subject line because it's not just a "rich people" thing, but certainly a white-collar thing. People who work in white collar jobs where you have to collaborate with people constantly and don't always have individual control over the output of your work like to pursue activities in their off hours where they can achieve something on an individual level.
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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby NMG » Sat Aug 19, 2017 8:42 am

I would actually dispute that running is expensive, at least compared to other sports. What are the basic requirements? A pair of shoes, a t-shirt, some shorts? Say $150 to $200?

What's golf cost? You have clubs, shoes, clothes, balls, green fees, etc. Tennis? Shoes, racquet, balls, etc. Hockey? Equipment, ice time fees, etc. Hiking? Boots, backpack, poles, etc. Cycling? Bike, clothes, etc.

I'd actually say that running is one of the cheapest sports out there. Sure you can go overboard, but you go overboard with any sport if you really get into it. On a pure "entry level" basis, I have a really hard time seeing how running is a "rich" persons sport.

The white collar point is more interesting. Maybe the correlation is that white collar workers have more time to partake in sports? Maybe they work more regular hours? Maybe they have steady schedules? Weekends off? Maybe that type of employment is just more conducive to being able to schedule regular runs (or any exercise for that matter), which at least in my experience, is a huge component when it comes to seeing improvement and thus realizing enjoyment out of the activity.

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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby HCcD » Mon Aug 21, 2017 12:15 pm

NMG wrote:I would actually dispute that running is expensive, at least compared to other sports. What are the basic requirements? A pair of shoes, a t-shirt, some shorts? Say $150 to $200?

What's golf cost? You have clubs, shoes, clothes, balls, green fees, etc. Tennis? Shoes, racquet, balls, etc. Hockey? Equipment, ice time fees, etc. Hiking? Boots, backpack, poles, etc. Cycling? Bike, clothes, etc.

I'd actually say that running is one of the cheapest sports out there. Sure you can go overboard, but you go overboard with any sport if you really get into it. On a pure "entry level" basis, I have a really hard time seeing how running is a "rich" persons sport.

The white collar point is more interesting. Maybe the correlation is that white collar workers have more time to partake in sports? Maybe they work more regular hours? Maybe they have steady schedules? Weekends off? Maybe that type of employment is just more conducive to being able to schedule regular runs (or any exercise for that matter), which at least in my experience, is a huge component when it comes to seeing improvement and thus realizing enjoyment out of the activity.


Ummm, just on the weekend alone, not me .. Ha !!! .. customer spent over $1,500 :shock:

So, let's go shopping to our favourite Canadian Running Store ... and, yes, I will go for the top end of the scale for the must haves ?? :) :P

Garmin 935 - $680.00
Asics Kayano - $219.00
CompressionSocks - $80.00
Running Jacket - $90.00
Shirt - $50.00
Shorts - $60.00
Hydration Belt - $60.00
Hat - $30.00
Oakley Sunglasses - $250.00
etc ....

vs

Basic outfit from clearance/sidewalk sale , outlets like Winners, etc ..
Cheap old Timex Watch - $25.00
Sidewalk Sales Clearance Shoes - $60.00
Clearance Socks - $10.00
Basic Running Jacket - $40.00
Shirt from Outlet - $20.00
Short from Outlet - $20.00
Water Bottle - $10.00
Hat - $10.00
Sunglasses - $20.00

So, yeah, I guess, in any sport .. one can be as thrifty and/or as expensive as they want to be ?? :shifty:
Race Results: http://itsmyrun.com/index.php?display=p ... unner=HCiD

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NMG
Bill Crothers
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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby NMG » Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:20 pm

HCcD wrote:So, yeah, I guess, in any sport .. one can be as thrifty and/or as expensive as they want to be ?? :shifty:


Agree completely!

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purdy65
Abby Hoffman
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Joined: Fri Apr 25, 2008 6:06 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby purdy65 » Tue Aug 22, 2017 4:49 am

Ha! That sale must have made the boss happy! I think my record is $600 or so. Oh, I run, and I literally don't have expensive versions of any of those things.

Old model shoes
Vicoactive on sale.
Multitude of socks from Christmas
Compression socks from CEP promotion
7 year old fuel belt

It can be as cheap or expensive as you make it


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jonovision_man
Bill Crothers
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Re: Why are rich people drawn to endurance sports?

Postby jonovision_man » Mon Sep 04, 2017 1:55 pm

NMG wrote:The white collar point is more interesting. Maybe the correlation is that white collar workers have more time to partake in sports? Maybe they work more regular hours? Maybe they have steady schedules? Weekends off? Maybe that type of employment is just more conducive to being able to schedule regular runs (or any exercise for that matter), which at least in my experience, is a huge component when it comes to seeing improvement and thus realizing enjoyment out of the activity.


My neighbour is a "blue collar" worker, I'm a "white collar" worker.

The big difference I see? He spends his entire day on his feet doing physical things - so when he gets home the last thing in the world he wants to do is more exercise. :)

Meanwhile I'm making up for an entire day of being sedentary.

So maybe it's not about $$ or class or time (he has as much money as I do, he lives in the same 'hood, drives as nice of cars, etc)... but more just about need.

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